Category Archives: Clifty Falls State Park

Merry Christmas

broadway christmas 2 2017

Merry Christmas from the Kasper family !!


Fall Cascade

clifty fall scurve 2 2015

A serene scene from Clifty Falls State Park in Madison Indiana. Warm fall light helps to create a very peaceful mood in this image I captured at the park. There are many much larger and more photogenic falls here but this one always brings me back for a visit because of its solitude and peacefulness it exudes.

The Road Thru Clifty

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Another shot from Clifty Falls State Park in Madison Indiana. I captured this image on a early fall day walking the road that traverses the east side of Clifty Canyon Reserve located inside the park.

Wasn’t the best shot I ever got but it was one of those images that remind you of a special day that you will long remember !!

Stairway to Heaven

clifty sunset 1 2017

Another beautiful fall scene from Clifty Falls State Park in Madison Indiana. Even though it was a warm dry fall I was still able to capture a few nice images this year.

Little Clifty Bridge

little clifty 1 2017

I was hiking at Clifty Falls State Park near Madison Indiana when I came across this beautiful scene. I caught the sun as it slid beneath the rugged hillside that surrounds Little Clifty Falls and the bridge that spans it. Timing is such a major player in photography and once again I ended up at the right place at the right time !!

Fall at Clifty Falls State Park

Here is an example of the color we are starting to experience here in Southern Indiana at Clifty falls State Park located near Madison Indiana.

It started out warm and dry here but the last few days have cooled dramatically and we have received much needed rain to help spur on the color that we had been lacking.

So starting now thru the next ten days the color will really be beautiful here and it should be a great destination for viewing the wonderful fall colors that blanket the hillsides and gorges that grace this part of Indiana.

Common Buckeye

common buckeye 2 2017

Thought I would share another great butterfly from southern Indiana, the Common Buckeye, photographed at Big Oaks NWR near Madison Indiana. Maybe the most beautiful butterfly that inhabits our area and certainly one of my favorite.

According to Wikipedia….

Junonia coenia, the common buckeye or buckeye, is a butterfly in the family Nymphalidae. It is found in southern Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia and all parts of the United States except the northwest, and is especially common in the south, the California coast, and throughout Central America ,Colombia & India .The subspecies Junonia coenia bergi is endemic to the island of Bermuda.

Its habitat is open areas with low vegetation and some bare ground. This species and its relatives were placed formerly in the genus Precis.

The bold pattern of eyespots and white bars on the upper wing surface is distinctive in much of its range, though compare related species in the same genus. These are mangrove buckeye (Junonia evarete) and tropical buckeye (Junonia genoveva), formerly considered one species, and the smoky buckeye (Junonia evarete). The eyespots likely serve to startle or distract predators, especially young birds. The species has many flights throughout the year, with mostly northward migrations for the summer. Much of the northern United States is only colonized in the fall from southern populations. Some of the later broods move southwards in the fall. Common buckeyes exhibit seasonal polyphenism, the summer version of the butterfly has light yellowish ventral wings and is called “linea”. The fall morph has pink ventral wings, and is called the “rosa” morph.

Adults feed on nectar and also take fluids from mud and damp sand. Males perch on bare ground or low plants, occasionally patrolling in search of females, but they are not territorial. The female lays eggs singly on buds or the upper side of leaves. The caterpillars are solitary and feed on the foliage, flowers, and fruits of the host plant. A variety of (typically) herbaceous plants are used, including especially plants in the snapdragon family (Scrophulariaceae). These include snapdragon (Antirrhinum), toadflax (Linaria), and Gerardia. Caterpillars also feed on plants of the plantain family, such as Plantago; and the Acanthus family including ruellia (Ruellia nodiflora). Larvae feed singly. Adults and some larvae overwinter in southern areas. The pupa may not have a resting phase (diapause), as in many other butterflies.

Well that’s the description of this great butterfly hope you enjoyed the info and image, thanks for stopping by and taking a look.